4 Ways to Follow Up Without Being Pesky

By Adrienne Erin - Writer

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Job interviews can be stressful, but the period after an interview has finished can feel like agony. It’s easy to get filled with doubt and overanalyze whether you responded to questions in the best possible ways. That vicious pattern usually gets worse the longer you wait to hear back about your dream job. Read below and get four appropriate ways to follow up without making the hiring manager want to pull his or her hair out and decide you’re not the best candidate after all.

Write a Thank You Note

Ideally, this should be sent on the day of the interview, a few hours after your meeting. It’s okay to send the correspondence via e-mail unless you get the sense the interviewer is old-fashioned and would much rather get something written on pretty paper with an ink pen. Following up quickly reminds the interviewer you appreciate his or her time, and makes you memorable.

Make One Phone Call

Yes, that’s right, just a single call. Maybe you interviewed in conjunction with some physiatry openings at a local recruitment agency and were told the clinic that is seeking employees wouldn’t be making any decisions until a certain date. Wait until a few days after that deadline has passed, and then, if you’re feeling confident, call once to inquire about whether the open positions have been filled. Calling more than that could make you look like a pest.

Follow the Company on Social Media

Hopefully you were already doing this before the interview took place. If not, make sure to follow the company’s respective social media pages and interact with them as appropriate. However, that doesn’t give you a license to blow up the social media page with a barrage of messages reminding the hiring manager of your candidacy. Your presence on social media should be enough to keep you visible.

Plan Out Your Phone Messages

Leaving a message for someone’s voicemail can be even more nerve-wracking than talking to him or her in person. Avoid any major blunders by writing a brief script before you make the call. The hiring manager almost certainly has received similar calls from people in your situation. It takes time to respond to phone calls, and you don’t want to be seen as someone who got flustered and carelessly didn’t plan out what to say before dialing. Follow the advice you’ve already read and just call once, only after you’ve gotten prepared.

It’s tempting to be more assertive, but there’s a fine line between being someone who’s interested and engaged, and a person who causes major headaches for an already taxed hiring manager.

Besides keeping these four tips in mind, remember, if you’re seriously in the running for a position, the hiring manager likely won’t forget about you entirely. If things don’t turn out as you’d hoped, try not to be too discouraged.

Learn from the experience, and realize the reason you didn’t get a position might have been more related to the fact that someone else was just better qualified. There’s no reason to beat yourself up over what you might have done wrong, especially since a hiring manager may not ever disclose if you made mistakes that ultimately took you out of the candidate pool. 

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